2014 Super jet sunk and won't start. What now?

Proformance1

Liquid Insanity
Joined
Feb 9, 2006
Likes
675
Location
New York Crew
#21
If you had clogged fuel lines on a 2014 you need to look at your fueling practices or youll be back here again with the same issue. Fuel can, cap, storage, etc. also look into using Starbrite fuel treatment for ethanol use
 

DAG

No Risk It, No Bisquick
Joined
Apr 19, 2006
Likes
3,549
Location
Charlotte, NC
#22
I don’t think I’ve ever seen a clogged “line”? Did he mean clogged internal filter? Is your line OEM grey or dark olive in color or aftermarket translucent colored line? I would suggest to shoot Jet Manic a PM and grab a couple “fuel filter clunks” and put an additional fuel filter in line right at the tank. The clunk will keep the big stuff from being sucked up in the first place and the inline filter will get most of the small stuff except for hair like fibers them seem to get caught by the internal carb filter.

I wish my first sinking only cost $100
 
Joined
Apr 23, 2012
Likes
324
Location
Wisconsin
#23
So there I was... Took my wife out to Harsens Island (Snooks Hwy cut over by Browns Bar) early Saturday morning to go ride the delta. The wife took off on her 1990 SN650 and came back 15 minutes later with the wtf look on her face. "Why aren't you riding with me?!" "Blahh blah blah" There I am floating and crying on my stalled out 2014 SJ700 superjet :-( Sighhhhhh..... Took the plugs out, replaced with new, gapped, same old $hit. Could it be the Reeds? Perhaps!? It felt like only one out of the two pistons were firing. Spark on both wires too. Hmmmm???
Here I am on Monday towing my skis all the way out to Lakes Motor Sports in Waterford, MI (BTW they are the BEST in Michigan!). I was right! When I let my friend ride my ski a few weeks back I knew that he could have possibly ran the ski at full throttle with water full in the engine compartment. Your typical Reed tearup! Whoa is me, whoa Is me!
As @Flash-FX put its "When doing "deep" subs or filling your motor compartment with excess water... while it's running will certainly destroy reeds. (You can compress air but not water). Get it?"
Yes, I get it and so does my wallet!
If you were suspicious of reeds why didn't you just look quickly yourself? They are one of the cheapest new parts you can buy and takes about 10 minutes to replace.
 
Joined
Jun 28, 2018
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0
Location
Salmon Arm, BC
#24
To get the water out, take out the plugs and crank the ski over. Alternating a finger over each plug hole can sometimes help.

For very bad ingestion, flip it over, dont just hope it drains, crank it upside down so the pistons are moving and opening the ports fully.

Make sure the plugs are dry, compressed air helps, you can ever heat them up a little with a lighter, use new plugs if any doubt of being fouled.

Put a tiny shot of starter fluidin a plug hole, put the plug in lightly hand snug, leave the other llug out, crank over just a few revolutions, then alternate to the other hole, repwat until it fires.

If it will not fire, try flipping it again.

Important note, starter fluid burns hotter, with no lubrication and is more likely to backfire. Dont get carried away with your squirts.

When the ski does run, dont abuse it on one cylinder hoping the other will eventually clear out after riding hard, keep up your technique until both cylinders are firing.

Important note, do not run a ski withhand tight plugs formore than a moment. They can back out and ignite outside the block. Tighten them with a wrench when the ski is running again.

Tip, In the absence of a primer, you can hand choke a stock airbox. Placing your hand over the trumpet chokes better than the choke plate. Just realize the flooding with fuel and flooding with water are essentialy the same, excpet water is dangerous to your crank and fuel is dangerous to you.
Great advice! I have been struggling with my ski that hadn't run in 15 years (a long story). I tried this and it fired up almost immediately, after trying everything else for weeks! Thanks!
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2014
Likes
179
Location
Los Gatos, CA
#25
The story here doesn't add up, not sure how fuel lines can get clogged. But, glad it got running and in time to get out all of the moisture before the crank was toast.
 
Joined
Jun 18, 2019
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0
Location
Erie, PA
#26
How does one sink a ski. Better question how do i stop myself from sinking on? Ive been on mine for about 20 minutes (first time on a stand up) and it was pretty choppy i couldnt stay on it. should i be concerned about sinking it?
 
Joined
Sep 30, 2015
Likes
141
Location
Minnesota
#27
How does one sink a ski. Better question how do i stop myself from sinking on? Ive been on mine for about 20 minutes (first time on a stand up) and it was pretty choppy i couldnt stay on it. should i be concerned about sinking it?
When you fall, don't just float on it while not riding. Water will go in through the hood seal (mostly). Be above the water (riding) more than you're in the water. An electric bilge pump can help. Also, most stock hulls won't fully sink to the bottom. The rear will bob right at water level.
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2014
Likes
179
Location
Los Gatos, CA
#28
I also wonder how they sink so that I can avoid it. I've wanted to add some water and see on the trailer how fast the stock siphon bilge pumps it out to get a gauge for it.
 
Joined
Aug 30, 2011
Likes
289
Location
Cleveland
#29
I also wonder how they sink so that I can avoid it. I've wanted to add some water and see on the trailer how fast the stock siphon bilge pumps it out to get a gauge for it.
I'm not entirely sure it would even work on land. The siphon works on pump pressure and I'm not sure if the pump is pressurized with just air.

Can anyone confirm or deny
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2014
Likes
179
Location
Los Gatos, CA
#32
Sorry, yes, I meant on a trailer in the water. If the ramp is not busy I will try it tomorrow.

No it would not work out of the water with the prop in air, it needs water moving by to create enough suction in the low pressure zone of the nozzle.
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2014
Likes
179
Location
Los Gatos, CA
#33
I filled up my ski on the launch ramp with about 3" of water in the hull. It actually took a while with a big cup, that is a LOT of water.

With it running and held at a fast idle, the water level finally started to visibly lower in about 2 minutes. I was already pushing the dock with the jet so I didn't want to hold it at half throttle, that's a lot of thrust.

It probably would have taken 10 minutes or more to drain. I do not know how much faster it will siphon at half or more throttle while riding but I imagine it is linear with thrust?

I understand why freestyle riders have a bilge pump. Any time I check after doing subs, slides, and falling off there is never any water in the hull though so it is fine for the rec riding I do.

I have laid the ski over on its side with the handle pole up and the vent in the hood underwater which I've found sometimes happens after falling off from 180's, and it does slowly take on water, (but not fast) likely due to the hood baffling. If the hood comes off and the engine bay edge goes under the water line I can see the ski sinking in mere seconds.
 
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