Deutsch Connectors

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Jan 8, 2007
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#1
I intend to install Deutsch connectors on my stator wires and would like to hear opinions on:
1.What model/series is everyone using (DT, DTM, Black, Grey)?
2.Are you using Deutsch or the Deutsch "type" compatible? Any noticeable differences?
3.Solid or stamped pins, gold or nickel?
4. What size(gauge)? 22,18,16,14?
5.Where you locating? Box end ,flywheel end, in the middle?
6.Any horror stories/regrets?
 
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#2
Oem stator I would recommend the DT series. DTM is reduced wire seal size 18,20,22 gauge. Black or Grey does not change the characteristics of the plug so that is personal preference. I recommend stamped nickel or gold pins and very highly recommend soldering the crimps. If you need part numbers PM me I have them in my notes
 
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#4
https://www.digikey.com/

1734-1011-ND (6 pin M)
1734-1021-ND (6 pin F)
1734-1128-ND (Wedgelock)
1734-1053-ND (Wedgelock)
A122156-ND (stamped socket)
A106729-ND (stamped pin)
Thanks! Was just about to pm you. Any reason you're using the stamped pin over the solid? Would you know what gauge wire stock stators use? What did you do for the #6 hole? I'm thinkin I'm gonna run an extra ground to the box end, and bring the other end @ flywheel out of the sleeve and ring terminal it to a cover bolt to act as a leash/strain relief instead of using block off a pin. What did you do?
 
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#5
Thanks! Was just about to pm you. Any reason you're using the stamped pin over the solid? Would you know what gauge wire stock stators use? What did you do for the #6 hole? I'm thinkin I'm gonna run an extra ground to the box end, and bring the other end @ flywheel out of the sleeve and ring terminal it to a cover bolt to act as a leash/strain relief instead of using block off a pin. What did you do?
I was using the solid terminals early on, I bought the specific tool to crimp them also. I had problems because at one point I was using them on a 20 gauge wire and they don’t crimp down solid that small. Once I went to the stamped terminals in the DT and DTM series along with soldering the crimp, my issues have diminished to zero. I also haven’t noticed much of a corrosion resistance difference between the gold and nickel. When at one point I had a plug where the wire gland was too large and wouldn’t seal around the wire (wrong application) it would fill with water. Both the gold and nickel corroded in damn near the same amount of time. But contrary to that I have only used the correct plug and wire gland size since, and I’ll tell you the Deutsch branded plugs live up to there claim because they stay dry.


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#6
Stator wires are 16 gauge if I remember correctly which puts you in the standard DT series plug and terminal bracket. For future reference the DTM plug is a miniaturized version of the DT series but uses a smaller pin,socket, and wedge locks specifically for 18-22 gauge wire. Along with that the gland holes are smaller to seal on that size.


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#7
I was using the solid terminals early on, I bought the specific tool to crimp them also. I had problems because at one point I was using them on a 20 gauge wire and they don’t crimp down solid that small. Once I went to the stamped terminals in the DT and DTM series along with soldering the crimp, my issues have diminished to zero. I also haven’t noticed much of a corrosion resistance difference between the gold and nickel. When at one point I had a plug where the wire gland was too large and wouldn’t seal around the wire (wrong application) it would fill with water. Both the gold and nickel corroded in damn near the same amount of time. But contrary to that I have only used the correct plug and wire gland size since, and I’ll tell you the Deutsch branded plugs live up to there claim because they stay dry.


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Good info. Thanks! When you say your soldering the crimp, where you actually soldering? Over the area you crimped? You must keep it tight because it looks to me any excess would interfere with sealing gland.
 
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#8
So they are a two stage crimp, first section is what crimps on the bare stranded wire, second section crimps around wire sheathing. I solder the bare wire section of the crimp. Just be very careful that you don't get solder on the step just above the crimp. That section locks the terminal into the plug housing. The sealing gland only seals on the sheathed part of the wire about 1/8" past the terminal so hard to mess that up.
 
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#9
I recently used
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00D3S25CC/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
with this crimper
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002CCISPS/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I am very happy with the result, however I can see what zzylstra is saying about the crimp not being enough on smaller 20 gage wires. On the factory stator wires it worked quite well - when i tugged on the wires they didn't budge inside the pin, and i was pulling hard enough for the coating to slide on the metal strands. locally I've been pushing for people to do this and to maintain the same pinout so if we want to swap parts or troubleshoot it is very quick to do so.
 
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#10
I recently used
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00D3S25CC/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
with this crimper
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002CCISPS/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I am very happy with the result, however I can see what zzylstra is saying about the crimp not being enough on smaller 20 gage wires. On the factory stator wires it worked quite well - when i tugged on the wires they didn't budge inside the pin, and i was pulling hard enough for the coating to slide on the metal strands. locally I've been pushing for people to do this and to maintain the same pinout so if we want to swap parts or troubleshoot it is very quick to do so.
Very nice! I buy bulk so Digi-Key is cheaper. But yes that kit makes it very convenient, although I don’t know if I would trust that 16-20 awg in the description. 16-18 awg max


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#11
Update. This is what I wound up doing after beating it to death research wise. I got ahold of a guy named John @www.deutschconnectorstore.com. I actually caught him when he was on the forklift but he stayed with me and answered all my pestering questions. I ordered everything except 1 piece from him. What he does is package the more popular connectors into kits. Instead of you having to order all the individual pieces to make a complete plug, he does it for you. I ordered a 6 pin AT plug.
DSC02187.JPG
Everything you need is in this bag, except for 1 thing, plug, receptacle, pins, sockets, wedgelocks are here. You will need to order cavity plugs separate. If not, you can install the 6th wire as a tail with heat shrink, that's your choice. I ordered plugs from John but did not use. More on that later.
 
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#12
Since I'm only doing 1 size wire,(16 ga), I wound up selecting solid nickel pins and sockets.( The little connectors inside the plug and receptacle). @zzylstra mentioned he had some issues and wound up soldering, when I mentioned this to John I was scolded loudly with a NEGATIVE. I was basically told" Have faith young Jedi, trust the system". John said he was a 20yr Deutsch Installer and based on his knowledge, I believe him. The solid nickel pins & sockets(no green stripe, they are 16/14 ga) are what your after for stator wires. Since I'm only doing 1 size, I ordered the dedicated crimpers that do 16ga solids' ONLY!
DSC02188.JPG
I also ordered the extract tool ,money well spent.
DSC02247.JPG
Also in this pic are the cavity plugs, the one on the left from John, the one on the right I ordered from Moser electric. The one from John just seals in the silicone gland @ the back of the plug.
DSC02207.JPG
I wasn't happy with this and after another call to John, who took all my calls patiently, He mentioned "locking cavity plugs, used in Military connectors. I LIKE THE SOUND OF THAT! John does not sell these, I got them from Moser. Get the 16ga locking cavity plug.
DSC02252.JPG
 
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#13
On to the install. I figured where I wanted the Plug/Receptacle . My reasoning here is if I pull the motor(heavy, awkward) there is no way the stator wire can lay under the motor getting crushed. Another thing I've noticed is used stators all have different length wires on them, but they're all @ least this long.
DSC02198.JPG
I also picked the longest stator wires I had to make the tail out of the box. You always gonna reuse this.
DSC02307.JPG
 
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#14
I used the Zerk fitting mounting bracket to mount the plug, I used this step on housing for a where to cut gauge.
DSC02193.JPG
DSC02197.JPG
Also in this pic are the strippers I use, Commercial Elec from Home D. The mounting clip also came from John.
DSC02196.JPG
 
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#15
Now's the time for new sheathing, McMaster 5/16 worked, nice loose, should drain. *Note, I switched to an ATP box, 5/16 is to big for the compression connector they use, you got to go with 1/4 there making for an interesting fight. I soldered 5 stator wires to 1, then massaged them through the 1/4.
DSC02306.JPG
 
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#16
When stripping wires, use the step as a strip gauge.
DSC02205.JPG
Crimp on your pin or socket. The dedicated crimpers are of a ratcheting/threshold type, they'll automatically release when you've reached proper tension.
Be sure to fully seat your pin/socket in the tool.
DSC02203.JPG
 
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#19
Perfect How-To @mikesx. I mainly get my terminals/housings/wedges in bulk and just found that Digikey has a much lower price, although I have ordered from the same place as you with very quick shipping and service. For a long time I did prefer the solid terminals and also have the same tools you have, much easier to crimp and go IMO. With our total loss systems a solid connection is very much needed because of the intense ground system that it needs in order to be bulletproof and reliable. Our deutsch connectors are not hard mounted with the engine so vibration in conjunction with solder connections was not an issue for us.
 
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#20
Perfect How-To @mikesx. I mainly get my terminals/housings/wedges in bulk and just found that Digikey has a much lower price, although I have ordered from the same place as you with very quick shipping and service. For a long time I did prefer the solid terminals and also have the same tools you have, much easier to crimp and go IMO. With our total loss systems a solid connection is very much needed because of the intense ground system that it needs in order to be bulletproof and reliable. Our deutsch connectors are not hard mounted with the engine so vibration in conjunction with solder connections was not an issue for us.
Thanks ZZ. I didn't want to keep buggin you so I found John to bug. When I mentioned solder, he went off. So I figured try it without, I could always solder later. Happy to say, no issues so far. BTW, do you use the 6th pin for a 2nd ground? Seems like it would make sense in your case. Yeah and I like to shop crap down as far as possible, but I was out of time and this guy had everything packed together, kinda of prevented me from pullin one of my signature bonehead plays of ordering one piece wrong.
 
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