How to get that smooth epoxy/fiberglass finish?

Joined
Feb 19, 2013
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Chico California
#1
Working on getting a smooth/glass look to my fiberglass and having a hell of a time. Do you just keep sanding and brushing [roll and tip] epoxy until it comes out smooth? Seems like I always have little divots. Any tips; on peel ply or fillers I can add to get a nice even finish with minimal sanding? I get same results with s-glass, biax, weave etc so I could use some help.


@Vumad
@Nate_D
@hink320
 

CD155MX

Squirrel!!!
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Jun 10, 2006
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Moreno Valley, CA
#5
Making repairs. Also looking to redo the bottom of my blaster.
I would highly recommend looking into vacuum bagging. I've dipped my toes into the waters a bit on the last few repairs I've done and have been overwhelmed with the finish product compared to normal wet layup. It feels like cheating almost. Next step beyond that is like what @hink320 said. Infusion will yield even better results than vacuum bagging.
 
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#6
I would highly recommend looking into vacuum bagging. I've dipped my toes into the waters a bit on the last few repairs I've done and have been overwhelmed with the finish product compared to normal wet layup. It feels like cheating almost. Next step beyond that is like what @hink320 said. Infusion will yield even better results than vacuum bagging.
You are probably right. And what better place to practice then on the bottom of a ski. :)
 
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#8
Quinc- if you decide to do the bottom. Use three or more wide strips with the seem falling in between the center section and the chine(in the valley between). I have tried several times to do it with one piece. The problem is under heavy vacuum the fabric will separate from the low area making voids at random. If you use at least three pieces over lapped they can migrate during the process and not cause the fabric to pull away.
 

McDog

Training 'em right
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#11
It will be a lot of supplies, equipment, and trial and error for bagging or infusion. Please post updates and write ups to let us know how it goes. The more details the better. I may tackle this someday myself.
 

hink320

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sask, canada
#13
Ya, bagging definitely helps. If you are stuck hand laying, placing some poly or perforated release film over the glassed area before it cures seems to help smooth it out.
 
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mike b

Michael "Mayhem" Bevacqua aka MikeyChan
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#14
Bagging or atleast laying peel ply and vaccum bag over top really helps smooth out the finish. Make sure to use epoxy resin which sounds like you already are as I believe the peel ply says epoxy and vylnester, not polyester. If I have that correct. I have only used with epoxy. Biggest thing is I have found pin holes when doing repairs. Not sure if this is just gases escaping and I need to practice more. I'll leave that to the experts. But the repair being bagged under or not under vaccumm is really nice and clean. Cuts down sanding time for sure.

This finish is great for the tray as a quick sand and perfect foe tued. Like I said before a good amount of pin holes you will see in the primer. I'm sure infusion lays out without pin holes but never done that on a repair.
 

Vumad

Super Hero, with a cape!
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#15
You spray epoxy resin?
Pat at FGCI said never to spray epoxy resin.


If you are hand laying and rolling the glass it's going to get lumpy. Chop is especially bad because it move so much. Weave and cloths can stay together. They will contour to whatever is under them of course. The only thing I know of that you can do to get a perfect finish to is do body work after. Mix Talcum powder with epoxy to do this. It sands easiest. Glass microspheres sand easy and are lightest but should only be used on places like the tray because they are hollow and leave pin holes. Put on a light dusting of spray paint and then sand to see where your low spots are. Do not sand into the fibers under your filler. Finish the job with a high build primer before paint.

Sorry bud, the only easy way I know to do body work is to pay someone else to do it.
 
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Portland
#16
Like Vumad said, I recently rockered my blaster and did the best I could with my minimal experience and short time line. After the glasswork I did several fill and sand sessions with epoxy mixed with lightweight fillers. By the end I stared to get the hang of it and wasted less material. If I had an extra couple weeks I could have made it a bit smoother but I made sure to focus on the most visible areas and it turned out pretty decent.
 
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