Removing Top Deck? (1987 JS550 Rebuild/Engine Swap)

Joined
Jul 30, 2015
Likes
229
Location
Sacramento Delta
#41
Someone somewhere said that Yamaha sprayed the Superjets from the factory with Dupont Imron.

I know my 1977 Corvette was sprayed with Imron at the Chevy factory.

It is tough paint. So, you don't use a clear. I want to learn to spray Imron, but I am going to buy a cheap supplied air respirator and pump off of ebay before I even attempt it.

See this thread if you are interested:

http://www.pwctoday.com/showthread.php?t=121954

And if you do it, please post your results!
 

Sanoman

Feellikekrashing
Joined
Jun 23, 2009
Likes
2,346
Location
NE Tenn
#42
Someone somewhere said that Yamaha sprayed the Superjets from the factory with Dupont Imron.

I know my 1977 Corvette was sprayed with Imron at the Chevy factory.

It is tough paint. So, you don't use a clear. I want to learn to spray Imron, but I am going to buy a cheap supplied air respirator and pump off of ebay before I even attempt it.

See this thread if you are interested:

http://www.pwctoday.com/showthread.php?t=121954

And if you do it, please post your results!
I hope you will read the MSDS on Imron.That poop is highly toxic! Don’t go cheap on a full suit and good respirator
 

smokeysevin

one man with a couch
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Likes
88
Location
Houston
#44
Filling in the low spots Part 1 (Neunundneunzig Weiße Luftballons)

I took a few days off from ski work, went to see Willie Nelson at Rodeo Houston (good show, poor sound quality) Replaced the header flange gaskets in my Tundra, did some gardening, where was I going with this?

Right! Today I started by sanding the hull and knocking the unsupported edges of the bottom deck reinforcement off. Once that was blown clean and wiped with acetone, I mixed up 2 batches (8oz and 4oz) of epoxy mixed with micro-balloons to fill in the rough spots. The micro balloons are really cool, they flow differently than the cabosil when stirring and mixing them with epoxy.

If we call cabosil peanut butter and the filler looks like marshmallow fluff then by logic the ski must be a Fluffernutter and therefor delicious.

That bit of culinary education out of the way, I also removed the remaining squeezed out adhesive from the edge of the tubbies and stripped the remaining paint/gelkote off.

Time Spent:
4 Hours (this seems to be a recurring theme...)

Tools Used:
Rockwell Oscillating Multi Tool
Porter Cable 5" Orbital Sander
Shop Vac
Box Cutter
3/4" Chisel

Materials Used:
12OZ Resin
9 Scoops of Micro Balloons
4 80 Grit Sanding Discs

Tunes Jammed To:
Album: Forever in the Friendzone
Artist: Suburban Legends
Comments: There are some high and low notes, I recommend listening to the whole album.

PPE Used:
Half Respirator
Tyvek Suit
3M Worktunes Headhones
2 pairs Hazard Frito 7mil blue bomber gloves

Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
26% (That may have been actual marshmallow fluff, I wasn't willing to taste it though. )

Percentage complete:
80% (You and I in a little E-shop, buy some microballoons with the money I got. Set them mixed in the garage of Sean, till one by one, they were on. Back again, bugs in the fill-air. Grab the tyvek and the sand-air. Sanding here, its almost time. Ninety-Nine Microballoons go by!)

Sean


I have no future as a body-guy or a baker



Low spots filled, high spots glazed


Streaky, what you look for in a high performance coating...
 
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smokeysevin

one man with a couch
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Likes
88
Location
Houston
#45
Filling in the low spots Part 2 (THE REFIL-IN-ING)

Dawn of the first day (48 hours remain)

I started out yesterday by knocking back (rather aggressively) the cake icing with a combination of the belt sander and disc sander. This got rid of most of the wrinkles and left me with a reasonably smooth surface. Once that was done and mostly flat, I blasted it with some black crust-oleum paint so I could see the low spots. I gave that time to dry and retired to the parlor to consider my life choices for the remainder of the evening. Once the witching hour arrived, I drifted into a fitful slumber and arose at the dawn of a new day.

Dawn of the second day (24 hours remain)

Tonight I went back to the garage and attacked the hull by hand with a 2 foot section of 3" diameter SCH 40 PVC Pipe. To actually remove material, I wrapped it in a full sheet of 80 grit purple sandpaper. This was pretty effective at removing the high spots from the chines. Mostly I went back and forth along the axis of the hull, the only tricky part was getting the transition points between the chine and the center of the hull. To take care of that area, I sanded on an alternating 45 and 135 degree pattern which seems to have worked pretty well.

To finish the hull off. I mixed up 2 batches of the micro balloons and resin, this time each was 4oz resin and 2 scoops of the filler. This mixed to a thick but still leveling consistency which I applied with a paint brush. I will be letting this setup and then repeating the sanding process tomorrow but hopefully with 150 grit to prep for a high build primer.

SIDE NOTE: I know everyone talks about not using cheap brushes because they shed like a husky in the summertime in Houston. There is a very good reason for that, picking out brush bristles is one of the most frustrating things I have done during this build. DON'T USE CHEAP BRUSHES

We will pick this up tomorrow to see how much more filler I need or if I just say screw it, its a JS hull and leave it as is...


Time Spent:
8 Hours over 2 days (Hand sanding with pvc pipe is a real workout, 3 hours of that was popping bubbles in the resin and picking lost brush hairs out of the filler...)

Tools Used:
Ryobi 3x18" Belt Sander
Porter Cable 5" Orbital Sander
Shop Vac
2'X3" SCH 40 PVC pipe
1/3 Sheet Sandpaper Drywall Sander Holder Thing

Materials Used:
8OZ Resin
4 Scoops of Micro Balloons
6 80 Grit Sand Paper Sheets
2 cheap paint brushes (learn from my mistakes, heed my warning young warrior)

Time Spent with Garage Door Open, shaking my ass back and forth while my neighbors looked on in horror:
2 hours, you have gotta use your legs when sanding. If you don't feel the burn, you won't get them gains. Never skip leg day, even if you are truing a hull.

PPE Used:
Half Respirator
Tyvek Suit
3M Worktunes Headhones
4 pairs Hazard Frito 7mil blue bomber gloves (Sandpaper kept ripping them)

Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
26.2% (Negligible Gains due to the brush bristles coming off the damn paintbrush)

Percentage complete:
90% (I think I have one more round of sanding before I sling some high build filler primer on it.)

Sean




Always let your Rustoleum be your guide



Sanding tool thing I used, its a plastic handle with some foam on it with clips that come loose anytime you look at it funny


Areas where I didn't have the layup schedule flat and sanded into the CSM layer show texture, Not my best moment.



We have established that cabosil is peanut butter, lots of microballoons are marshmallow fluff, allow me to introduce to you, doughnut glaze!


This little guy, don't worry about that little guy...
 
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smokeysevin

one man with a couch
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Likes
88
Location
Houston
#46
Motor and Electronics Part 1 (A Brief Intermission from Your Regularly Scheduled Program, Don't Get Used to it)

I will start by saying, I don't get the electronics setup on standups. That is a drastic oversimplification, but from a user and dealership perspective this setup has some really stupid "features". I cut my teeth with 4 stroke runabouts and all that stuff makes sense to me (except for seadoos, really brp?) You can pull the motor without opening any electronics up or having to hang the ecu off the motor when you go to remove it. The E-Box to me is basically a waste of space and weight. The electronics on the 4 stroke runabouts don't typically fail and when they do, its the gauges (for the most part). That being said, I plan to use that style of electronics to both simplify and add lightness on this build.

Complaints:

1) The entire system is interconnected without easily reachable disconnects. On the runabouts (couches) and most other vehicles the harness can be unplugged from the system without removing bolts (looking at you stator wiring)

2) The method of sealing the E-Box relies on orb fittings made of plastic that then have to be tightened against to seal the wiring that passes through them. It works as long as the fittings are tight (but not too tight) and as long as the rubber is new.

3) The E-Box itself contains a weird mix of sealed and unsealed electronics. The ECU itself is potted but the connections to the trim and power wires are unsealed. The fuse holder is sealed in the E box but the connections are open. The coil wires are sealed with epoxy (more or less permanently) while the starter solenoid is open.

Proposed Solution:

1) Since the ECU is potted and I have a ready supply of sealed connectors, I am just going to mount the stock ECU on a plate and connect the system using stock style sumitomo connectors that are commonly used on the runabouts.

2) By swapping to an external setup, it eliminates the issue with Complaint 2, I will also be moving the coil and starter solenoid to a plate rather than a box. For the coil I will swap to the couch coil with different plug ends, for the solenoid, I will probably use one of the seadoo solenoids since they are small and sealed. Basically I will be replicating the STX-15f style electronics. This will free up lots of space and make the install much cleaner and more modern. Service should be loads easier.

Mounts and Swap

I finally got around to opening my first round of goodies from Rhaas Products today. From a first glance, the mounts are really well made and the adapter plate is very nicely machined. I thought the custom hardware was a nice touch for the bedplate adapter. I also placed my order for the driveline conversion today, I went with the grooved plate, standard plastic bulkhead (for now) and added the conversion bearing. My X2 Driveshaft showed up today and my 750 Pump and 650 nozzle are on the way.

Motor

As for the motor, I have not spent much time going over it. Externally, it is super clean. I will probably get into it tomorrow or Friday to give it a once over. Off the bat, I need both the oil pump blockoff and the crankcase drain blockoff. I will need new reed gaskets and carb gaskets, 2 carb kits, and exhaust gaskets. I plan to do a leakdown test on the engine and verify the crank seals are ok before going too far with it. Plans for now are to run it stock but freshened up.

Time Spent:
4 Hours (most of which was spent cleaning the cocaine sanding dust out of the work area and wheeling my shop carts around)

Tools Used:
Broom
Shop Vac
Air Blow Gun
Box Cutter

Materials Used:
None

PPE Used:
Half Respirator
3M Worktunes Headhones

Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
22.2% (I removed some cured epoxy)

Percentage complete:
N/A (Taking a break from composite work to plan out where the engine and electronics are going to live)

Sean


Missing features? The "holes" are sealed.


The whole ECU is potted, I have tried to removed this before on a STX-15f Ecu when I was looking into flash tools and its a royal pain. The STX ecus are sealed really well, I would not hesitate to run this out of the E-Box provided I can get a good connector installed.


It really reminds me of a shrunken 15f Ecu which makes sense given this was probably 10 years older than when the 12f came out.



Parts, Living on the gulf coast, well away from fresh water, I am not used to seeing older gear that is this clean.


RHAAS PRODUCTS BABY
 
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smokeysevin

one man with a couch
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Likes
88
Location
Houston
#47
Potential Paint Scheme 1 (Enforced Idleness Breeds Boredom)

I am currently waiting on parts and don't really feel like getting dusty right now so I spent some time bench racing and making go-fast graphics. I got to talking with a buddy of mine over the weekend and since the 750 I am dropping in is so clean he suggested using the big pin 750 color as an accent on the ski. I hadn't considered it but thought it could be a cool setup. I also already had some interlux brightsides steel grey for an unrelated project that got put on hold which led to this.

1584413932105.png

It's not finished by any stretch of the imagination but I am happy with where its going so far.

Time Spent:
1.5 Hours (I found a base layout online from IPD and set about removing all their hard work so I could scribble over it in crayon)

Tools Used:
Paint.NET
Corsair K95 RGB Keyboard
TTEsports Level 10M Mouse
MSI 34" Ultrawide
Hyper-X Cloud 2 Headphones
Ikea Desk Chair

Materials Used:
None (bits and bytes only)

PPE Used:
None (I too like to live dangerously)

Music Listened to with the Wife While I Worked:
Ida Mae (British blues group, give them a listen)

Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
22.2% (Working in the study)

Percentage complete:
N/A (Taking a break from composite work to plan out where the engine and electronics are going to live)

Sean
 

smokeysevin

one man with a couch
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Likes
88
Location
Houston
#48
Small Update 1 (Intermission, go get some snacks)

I have been kind of dragging ass lately for which I apologize dear readers. Mostly this time has been spent waiting on parts or working on other projects. I had a string of bad ebay luck and received some broken parts, fought to get a refund, waited, ordered more parts, never got them, fought for a refund, ultimately got my money back, and finally reordered from a less sketchy seller.

In route is a 750 pump assembly to match the Rhass driveline conversion. Supposedly its still being made, hopefully it will show up soon.

I received my electrical parts from Eastern Beaver and did a base layout of how I am planning to mount the electrics.

I also bead blasted the motor mount adapters and installed the bedplate adapter onto the 750. Once I stuck it in the hull, I realized I don't remember which way the bedplate goes on the motor so I may need to flip it around. I am also not happy with the way the paint is holding up on the bedplate and motor mount adapters so I may end up redoing them.

I have a line on a 650 coffmans pipe and a 650 pjs pipe for the 750, any preference towards one or the other?

Time Spent:
3 Hours (Blasting, spraying, cleaning, and bolting)

Tools Used:
Impact Driver
Blast Cabinet


Materials Used:
Glass Bead Blast Media
Black High Temp auto paint
Cardboard

PPE Used:
Half Mask Respirator

Weeks Wasted Without Doing Anything on the Ski :
1

Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
22.2% (no new epoxy but there are some black over spray marks)

Percentage complete:
N/A (Please be careful out there, stay home wherever possible.)

Sean


Motor Mount Adapters (I am not thrilled with how well the paint stuck, I will probably redo these and the bedplate)


Stator Cavity ( I am really not used to ski motors being as corrosion free as this one is, its a welcome surprise)



Motor Swap Adapter and Oil Drain Blockoff


Placed in for Fit Check


Electrics Layout and Spacing Option
 
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smokeysevin

one man with a couch
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Likes
88
Location
Houston
#49
Small Update 2 (Intermission, how were your snacks?)

While I am waiting on the rhaas products pump conversion kit to ship, I picked up my exhaust and did a dry fit of the engine.

The PJS pipe hits the hull next to the front motor mount which I sort of expected. I need to mill the manifold-to-head face down to tuck it closer into the engine. I think I am also going to mill back the stinger mount so I can fit the chamber mount properly. The concern I have is that if I move the pipe too far towards the motor, it will hit the starter motor battery stud.

The cone needs some work, the lip is missing a few chunks and since its for a 650, I may play with the length a bit to open it up.

To tie the whole thing together, I am planning to bead blast the aftermarket parts and paint them factory Kawasaki teal.

Sean


PJS Pipe and Manifold


Test Fit 1
 
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smokeysevin

one man with a couch
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Likes
88
Location
Houston
#50
Small Update 3 (Intermission and the beatings will continue until morale improves)

I am wrapping up the 4wd swap and wiring on my tundra (see sig) which has kept me really busy. In the meantime I have been picking up parts to keep working. My fuel system parts have been delivered along with the rhass products pump swap, my new pump, some paint, and most of my electrical system parts.

Sean



Empty Kawasaki Fuse Holder


Side View


Under the hood


Room for a Spare Fuse


Buttoned Up


Oh great, now there are two of them...


On certain sites, this would be considered lewd.


Terminals, plugs, fuse holders, bung plugs.


1/4" Barb Bulkhead Fittings and 1/4" check valve fuel pickups. One extra of each.


By far, the nicest bolts I have bought, also the most expensive. They are also longer than I needed...


Documentation that came with the bolts


Cool Thread ID business card thing.

 
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smokeysevin

one man with a couch
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Likes
88
Location
Houston
#51
Driveline Conversion and Lower Deck Finish Part 1 (Twisted Certs and A pain in the Rhaas)

Driveline Swap Kit

This post is going to seem fairly critical of the parts I have, please understand that I am not badmouthing the company nor the parts themselves. I fully understand that making a full driveline swap that fits a fiberglass hull made in 1987 using components from 3+ other skis is not a trivial task. I also understand that there is quite a bit that goes into fabricating a component inexpensively while still making it suitable for our application. The components are well thought out and fill a niche that is highly specialized and I am happy that someone took the time to put it together. I have used the Rhaas motor mounts and adapter plates on this project and have been very happy with their components.

On the driveline conversion pieces, I opted to save some money and purchased the cheaper composite plate rather than the upgraded aluminum one. I feel like I made a mistake in doing so and will be reaching out to see if I can purchase the plate separately. This post is in no way asking for a handout nor do I expect one. The components are some form of molded polymer with fiber reinforcement. I am not a plastics/composite guy so I don't know specifics. I will say that the pictures on the Rhaas Products website made it look like the plate was fiberglass while the actual part is more close to a plastic reinforced with some kind of mesh. Again, not an expert.

Given that its not a race ski and it is probably better to flex the plate than crack it, this is not the end of the world.

Since I removed the rear hull extensions, I will probably end up cutting the plate shorter since it hangs off a fair bit now.

The shoe adapter required some massaging to seat properly. To clear the steering cable passthrough, I had to cut away enough material that I broke through into the seal area. I am not sure if this will end up being an issue since the directions suggest a healthy coating of 5200 over everything.

The machined components look well made and come anodized. The surface finish is a little coarse but its an adapter plate so who cares. I was a little surprised how much work went into developing the swap kit, none of the parts are at a 90 degree angle, it took quite a bit of thinking to get the pump kit to assemble the way it did and once assembled, it fits nicely.

The pump install actually requires you to modify the pump housing. Uncut, the pump actually will not fit into the opening at all. The swap also requires you to place 4 new 3/8" diameter holes in the pump mount so they will bolt into the adapter plates.

Prior to finishing up the dry fit on the pump conversion, I had to clean the hull down to bare smc which was not a fun process. The entire bottom deck had multiple layers of paint, gel coat, more paint, and silicone on it. Once that was cut back, the components were marked, drilled and dry fit.

The last 2 issues I ran into do not involve the Rhaas parts, rather the supporting parts. As part of the kit, you need an intake grate from a 750sx. I picked up a solas one because it had a scoop and was reasonably cheap. The first problem is that the scoop is too wide. I ended up taking 0.25" off each side and knocking the sharp edges back on the grate to make it fit. The second issue was that at some point my hull was "repaired" with new threaded inserts. these inserts were not flush with the hull which caused the intake grate to sit proud of the hull. In the process to correct that, one insert fell out of the hole while the other broke flush with the hull. I am still in the process of figuring out a repair for this. I am not thrilled about the inserts being stainless as I have galled bolts before, I have also had them corrode together and get stuck. I would prefer a brass insert but I am not sure if I have any right now.

One final item on the driveline. Currently the exhaust hits the inside of the hull on the left something fierce. I don't really want to cut the hull since I spent quite a bit of time making the inside nice but I will if that is the best option. I am holding off on doing that until I get the pump mounted and the driveshaft installed since I want to make sure the engine alignment is reasonably close before I start hacking.


Bodywork

I also broke out the trusty sanding block and tube and cut back the filler I applied a month or so ago, I was happy to find that it is not full of low spots. I was unhappy to find 15-30 pinholes that I will have to fill before I can throw a coat of paint on it. That's life though, can't complain.

The last remaining items on the bottom of the hull which still need to be addressed are, the rear sponson inserts which were previously riveted on and I drilled out to do the bodywork, and the front tubbies which have no mounting hardware on them.

On the sponsons, I may do something like an aluminum rivnut with a ton of epoxy behind it or since I am planning to do a rear exhaust, I may just carve out some of the foam and epoxy a ufo mount or aluminum plate onto the inside of the hull. To do the other side I would need to plan for a scupper install which may still be an option.

The tubbies originally had flat head screws on them and were just 5200'd to the hull. I removed all the hardware because I needed clearance on the inside for the motor swap. I am considering just glassing over the edges and filling the holes since they are bonded and foamed to the hull already but I am not set on that route.


Time Spent:
8 Hours (remove paint, gelcoat, paint, gelcoat, and silicone. Flip ski repeat process. Mount part, mark holes drill, repeat process. Sand bottom deck, find pinholes, start threads pass out.)

Tools Used:
Broom
Shop Vac
Air Blow Gun
Box Cutter
Oscillating Multitool
Drill and various bits
Spring Loaded Center Punch

Materials Used:
4 sheets of 80 grit sandpaper

PPE Used:
Half Respirator
3M Worktunes Headhones

Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
22.2% (no epoxy has been used recently, I need to flip the hull and prepare for more glasswork)

Percentage complete:
35% (I am not super happy with how this stuff currently fits so I may pull it off and redo some of it.)

Sean


Hull on side, dry fit. If you look close at the steering cable mount, you can see where I had to "relieve it" It is a deceptively simple part in that it looks on first glance that its simple but there is some real work that went into making this work right.


Slightly Better Angle


Holes Marked and Center Drilled. Not shown are the full 0/375" diameter holes and the other cuts needed. Basically you cut the rear ears off (shown on left) and reduce the width by 0.3"ish on each side. I will add a picture once I have it cut per the Rhaas template.


Solas intake grate not fitting, wings for heavy flow days I guess.


Scribed cut lines 0.25" from the edge


And it fits


Damaged and missing bungs, even with these cut back the grate still hangs a bit out into the flow of the shoe. I may mill back the mount a bit to get it to sit further flush with the hull inlet.


Assembled swap minus driveshaft and fastners. It still needs to finesse


Kit minus intake grate and rideplate. I had to cut the shoe mouth piece quite a bit to get it seated all the way so that it wouldn't twist the adapter plate. This would have been less of an issue if I had not been a cheapass and bought the aluminum shoe.


Gaps around where the intake grate mounts. Initially I thought the intake grate mounted to the plastic pieces but it bolts to the pump.


Not sure what I can do to clean up this area, its going to need a lot of work to get a good flow path there. This is really the only area where I am not happy with the kit. The rest I can live with but this is going to require quite a bit of buildup.

All that said, I would buy the kit again. I think it's expensive for the parts you get but you aren't really paying for just the parts, you are paying for all the work that went into getting the system to a point that someone can order the kit and use it without a huge amount of work. I can see that it was a process to get everything right and I can safely say, I would not have done this for myself if I had to start from scratch on it. I would have liked it more if the parts fit better but given the process limitations of the materials, they are close enough. If the parts had been made out of a different material or process, the cost would be too much to consider so I think they did their due diligence on them. I do maintain that the aluminum adapter piece is probably worth the extra cost and I will be ordering one if Rhaas will let me.

Sean
 
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smokeysevin

one man with a couch
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Likes
88
Location
Houston
#52
Exhaust Part 1 (Exhausting All My Options)

Driveline Swap Kit Redux

I want to start this post by saying that I reached out to Robin at Rhaas and I have an aluminum bulkhead on order now. Rhaas has been very quick to get me squared away and I am very happy with their customer service. I will update once I receive the new aluminum bulkhead. I am excited to get the part in so I can get the bottom end wrapped up.

I finished up grinding the pump housing per the instructions and got the pump dry fit in the hull. After that, I played around some more with pump alignment and spacing and got everything dialed in for the most part. The Rhaas Products motor mounts fit great as do the adapter plates for the motor conversion. I was able to throw the conversion bearing (also a very nicely made piece) on and slip the x2 driveshaft in and test fit the exhaust.

Exhaust

The exhaust has been a part I have not been looking forward to since I decided to ditch the perfectly adequate red top 650 for the big pin 750 that I am using now. I spent quite a bit of time reading through the other 750 swap builds so I had some warning about what it would take to make everything happy in this little hull. Running the OE 650 pipe was my original option because it was cheap and small but that quickly went out the window (after I got my oe 650 pipe in the mail, anyone want a really clean 650 pipe?) because several members pointed out that it would SERIOUSLY restrict the 750. In the interest of doing it correctly the first time, I chucked it on a shelf and ordered this PJS 650 pipe as its replacement since it is supposed to flow substantially more than stock. I imagine it won't measure up to a true 750 pipe but for now it should work reasonably well.

Once all the driveline pieces were on the hull, I threw the motor in and tried to fit the exhaust. The first piece that needed modification was the rubber exhaust connector that connects the up pipe to the front half of the chamber. I measured and trimmed the connector so that the 2 metal pipes would butt directly up against each other.

That done, the pipe mount off the stock 3 bolt exhaust manifold had to be modified to allow the chamber mount to actually sit up against the manifold. This required a fairly large chunk to be removed and ground back for the exhaust to even consider fitting up against the manifold.

With that out of the way, I unsuccessfully tried to fit the pipe in the hull again. This time, the mount that bolts to the manifold that I ground back had to be clearanced to pull the pipe closer to the center of the hull. I ended up grinding back about 3/16" - 1/4" before the pipe chamber would tuck in far enough. to clear the hull.

That done, the pipe still wouldn't fit properly, I inspected the chamber and found that it was egg shaped. Worse, it was egged in the wrong direction. A little persuasion with the vice and I was able to slip the coupler over the end of the chamber. The problem is that the rubber coupler that connects the chamber to the stinger is touching not only the hull, but also the stator cover and the cases. The bigger problem is that the positive lead to the starter is also touching the chamber and will require some creative denting. Having accomplished almost nothing, I moved onto seeing what else would hit.

To wrap up the night, I tried to fit the stock fuel tank in the hull and found out that it also hits on the stinger and will either need to be modified, or replaced with an aftermarket cell. Not knowing the material the stock tank is made out of, I am not entirely comfortable heating it up and trying to dent it.

At this point, I gave up and here we are.


Couple questions, what should I do for noise control and what size pipe do I need for a rear exhaust?

Time Spent:
2 Hours (Flip hull, dry fit engine again, unsuccessfully try to fit pipe, try not to cry, cry a lot, take pipe out, cut metal, try again, swear to calm down, modify, try again, giveup for the night and write post with excessive word count)

Tools Used:
Broom
Shop Vac
Air Die Griner w/ Tungsten Carbide Cutter
Bench Sander
Bench Vice

Materials Used:
N/A

PPE Used:
3M Worktunes Headhones

Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
22.2%

Percentage complete:
45% (If this exhaust leaks, I am just foaming the whole hull and running a snorkel to the carbs.)

Sean



Lower Manifold Mount Issue



Positive Lead to Starter Motor Issue



Hull Issue



Clamped and Ready for Surgery



Logo and Overspray



Fixtured and Ready to Grind



Before (there is no after, don't get your hopes up)



"Clearance"



"Bump Stop" Once the clamp is on there, I think it will be okay. Not "okay" okay, but okay in that the clamp will rub on the case and not the rubber.



After (I wouldn't leave you hanging like that, neither will this mount... once a new hole is drilled and tapped)



Hanger offset, new mount needs to be drilled and tapped so I can secure this bad boy



Look at all this room for activities



Positively Spacious



Merde


Fin.
 
Last edited:

smokeysevin

one man with a couch
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Likes
88
Location
Houston
#53
Exhaust Part 2 (Tank-ing one for the team)

Fuel Tank

Picking up where the last post left off, the fuel tank needed to be massaged to clear the stinger cone of the PJS exhaust. The tank was removed and given a moderately thorough cleaning with some mineral spirits before it was more aggressively cleaned on the outside with some citrus engine de-greaser and a grey scotch brite. Once cleaned I broke out the heat gun and got the tank uncomfortably hot before I gave it a good smoosh-ing. I am not particularly happy with my first tank adjustment. I may spring for a nice aluminum one at some point but for now, this will work alright since it doesn't leak and it allows the stock straps to be used.


Exhaust

I knew from the moment I started on this project that I wanted to go to a rear exhaust setup but couldn't find out much about how to get it going. Once I dropped the engine back onto the mounts and tossed the carbs on, I was able to play around with the space between the bottom of the carbs and the hull to see what would fit. Based on some feedback from this thread, I went ahead and ordered a shed load of 2" stainless exhaust tube, stainless combo bends, and a stainless u bend from verocious motorsports. I plan on stuffing that together into some kind of system. To get started, I poked some holes into the hull where it looked reasonable. On the inside, the hole was positioned so the exit was high enough to minimize the possibility of water backing into the exhaust. The rear hull hole was positioned with enough space to add a flapper tip and to add a pair of hull drains on the inner corners.

Once the cuts were made, I needed to cut the plug of foam out of the inside of the tube path. Initially, I tried to just use the tube to cut the plug out but I have wimp arms which prevented that technique from working. Instead, I went over to my stash of random drill bits and grabbed a 2" self feed auger bit and popped a 7/16" socket on the end of it. To make the bit reach all the way through, I popped 3 extensions onto that assembly and wrapped the whole mess in gorilla tape.

I only lost the bit in the hole twice thank you very much. While the bit can clear the chunks of foam, if you get too much built up behind the bit, you will separate the pieces. Running the shop vac in the bung hole to suck the chunks out helps keep the bit from getting stuck.

The biggest challenge with this whole thing is that you have to line your entry and exit up. I got within about an inch but had to go back and chunk out some of the foam to make the holes line up.

Time Spent:
4 Hours (Not completed yet)

Tools Used:

Shop Vac
Air Die Grinder w/ 100 grit flap wheel
2" Hole Saw
7/16" deep socket
3-12" 3/8" extensions
2" Self feeding saw
Drill
Impact Driver
Sharpie
Heat Gun


Materials Used:
3" wide gorilla tape

PPE Used:
3M Worktunes Headhones
Respirator
Welding Gloves

Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
22.2%

Percentage complete:
69% (nice)

Sean




Tank with new performance dent


Detail of said performance dent


Clearance around performance dent


Just one more of the performance dent


Rear exhaust hole and preliminary marks for hull drains


Inside Exhaust Hole (This looks low but give it a second and it will make sense)


Does it make a little sense now?


Detail of inner cut fit. ( I will end up plugging the holes in the bulkhead with something temporary. I would eventually like to run the new cooling lines to those holes just to keep everything clean but that will come later if/when I widen the tray.)


Rear exit location and angle


Tucks up nicely at the inside of the hood flange with clearance between the hull and exhaust.


Take a look inside the whispering eye


I took a chunk of foam out from the area directly behind the sponson rivet location so I could fit a ufo mount so the sponsons could be bolted on. I am going to do the same thing on the other side and stuff the hole with a scupper or move the fire extinguisher down there so I can use the upper mount to store dry goods.


Hull drain location. These are stock Kawasaki 15f drains I pulled off one of my scrap hulls.
 
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smokeysevin

one man with a couch
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Likes
88
Location
Houston
#56
Sponson Mount Part 1 (C'mon spon-son)

Since my hull has been painted no less than 4 colors with at least one layer of gel coat applied somewhere in there, one of my goals for this ski was to be able to properly paint the hull. This required me to remove the stock sponsons so that I could do a good job of sanding the rear section. Additionally, I may end up doing a layer of glass over the outside of the vertical portions of the hull to glass the tubbies on as well which would mean I need to cover the whole sides.

With the sponsons removed, I could have just tossed a new set of rivets in the holes but I wanted to make the tubbies into a tunable part as well so they needed to support adjustability. On the runabouts, this is done with a brass threaded insert held in place by a carbon steel bracket that keeps the inserts from spinning. Rather than go that route, I just fabbed up some aluminium plates that will get glued and screwed into the hull.

The stock sponsons only use 2 holes to fasten them but to make sure I didn't lose one of the brackets inside the hull, I added a third center hole that will become a semi-permanent retainer so the bracket doesn't come loose if the other 2 bolts are out. I plan to cabosil these onto the inside wall of the hull but I have also always been a belt and suspenders kind of guy.

Time Spent:
1 Hour (still need to chisel the foam out and glue these puppies in)

Tools Used:

Air Die Grinder w/ Tungsten carbide cutter
3/16" Drill Bit
1/4" Drill Bit
7/16" Drill Bit
1/8" Center Drill
0-Flute Chamfer Bit
M6x1.0 Tap
Spring Loaded Center Punch
Carbide Scribe
Calipers
T-Square
Clamps
Metal Cutting Band Saw
Belt/Disc Sander
Metal Cutting Circular Saw

Materials Used:
3/8" Scrap Aluminium Plate

PPE Used:
Worktunes Headphones
Safety Squints (do as I say not as I do)

Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
22.2%

Percentage complete:
33.3333% (have to cut the hole in the rear of the other side of the hull, chisel foam out and glue these puppies in)

Sean


Sponson, Bracket, Bracket



Enhance



Oh, yeah... she thicc



It fits on the outside, it should fit on the inside...
 
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smokeysevin

one man with a couch
Joined
Apr 17, 2013
Likes
88
Location
Houston
#57
Electronics Mount Fab Part 1 (No one will keep me in the box)

As mentioned in post: Motor and Electronics Part 1 (A Brief Intermission from Your Regularly Scheduled Program, Don't Get Used to it) and post: Small Update 1 (Intermission, go get some snacks) I am not planning to run an E-box. I hate them because they leak and then get filled with water which corrodes stuff. From what I can tell, all the electronic (minus the connectors) are sealed anyways. To address these issues, I am just mounting all the electronics to a plate a-la Kawasaki STX-15f

In short, I have converted all the plugs on the ECU to sealed sumitomo mt-90s. The components that do not use sealed plugs (voltage regulator and starter solenoid) will be potted with a short pigtail on them and a mt-90 plug. They are the OE connectors Kawasaki uses on lots of stuff and I have had a good experience with them thus far on my other projects.

Time will tell if I made a mistake but I am reasonably confident that it will work out.

Since the box went into the bin, I needed to make a replacement mount for all the goodies.

Time Spent:
2 Hours (Manually tapping in my drill press it tedious, I really need to get a proper tap guide)

Tools Used:
3/16" Drill Bit
#9 Drill Bit
1-3/4" Hole Saw
1/8" Center Drill
0-Flute Chamfer Bit
M6x1.0 Tap
M8x1.25 Tap
Spring Loaded Center Punch
Clamps
Metal Cutting Band Saw
Belt/Disc Sander
Metal Cutting Circular Saw

Materials Used:
1/4" Scrap Aluminium Plate

PPE Used:
Worktunes Headphones
Safety Squints (do as I say not as I do)

Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
22.2%

Percentage complete:
68% (The front hood latch will take some adjustment since my drill bit walked a bit when I drilled the bottom 2 holes for the plate mount and I still need to fabricate an ignition coil mount)

Sean


1593372581979.png
Step one: Measure
Step two: Sketch



Step three: Print
Step four: Find Mistake?
Step five: Try and figure out how you messed up that simple measurement
Step six: Print several more times after making the same mistake again



Step seven: Make sure you have a clean work surface



Step eight: glue 1:1 printout onto aluminum plate (That's right I am swapping between the US and UK spelling, sue me)



Step nine (not pictured) : Cut plate out
Step ten: Centerpunch all holes
Step eleven: Drill all holes
Step twelve: Tap all holes



Step thirteen: place in parts washer with mineral spirits to remove adhesive, then peel mask off.
Step fourteen: brush with flap disc for the swirls, everyone loves brushed aluminum.



Step fifteen: Bolt into hull with non-factory hardware because you lost the proper fasteners during garage "cleanup"



Step sixteen: Try to show that it does not interfere with the exhaust and battery but fail at taking the picture. Upload it anyways.



Step seventeen: Repeat step sixteen from a different angle.
 
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